‘They Hate My Guts’: Sen. Graham Begs Fox News Viewers For Cash, Whines He’s ‘Getting Killed Financially’





Anti-LGBTQ Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina appeared on Fox News Thursday to tell viewers he was “getting killed financially” by his Democratic opponent Jamie Harrison.

“My opponent will raise $100 million in the state of South Carolina,” the Republican senator said. “The most money ever spent in the history of the state on a Senate race in this state was by me in 2014 when I spent $13 million.”

“I’m being killed financially. This money is because they hate my guts.”



The Hill notes: “It wasn’t immediately clear what figure Graham was referring to, given that Harrison has raised just over $28 million as of the last Federal Election Commission filings in June, compared to Graham’s $29 million. Graham held a cash advantage over Harrison at the end of June, with the Republican reporting $15 million in cash reserves compared to Harrison’s $10.2 million.”

Graham noted that Harrison had reportedly raised $6 million in the 72 hours after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday.
Earlier this week Graham made a similar pitch on Fox News, when he asked viewers to “help me fight back” by contributing to his campaign.

“They’re not going to intimidate me, [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell [R-Ky.] or anybody else,” Graham said Monday. “I’m getting outraised 3 to 1, outspent 4 to 1.”

Recent polls revealed that Sen. Graham is neck and neck with his Democratic challenger.

“The survey from Quinnipiac University found Graham and Harrison both drawing 48 percent support from likely voters in South Carolina, with just 3 percent saying they are not sure who they are going to vote for on Nov. 3,” reported the Post and Courier last week.

Graham was blasted as a hypocrite this weekend after reversing his commitment to not nominate a Supreme Court justice during an election year.

In March 2016, Sen. Graham brushed off accusations of partisanship and invited critics to hold his feet to the fire after he opposed President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court pick to replace Justice Antonin Scalia. His reasoning? It was an election year.

“I want you to use my words against me,” the South Carolina Republican said. “If there’s a Republican president in 2016 and a vacancy occurs in the last year of the first term, you can say Lindsey Graham said, ‘Let’s let the next president, whoever it might be, make that nomination.'”

But on Saturday, less than 24 hours after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, Graham tweeted, “I will support President @realDonaldTrump in any effort to move forward regarding the recent vacancy created by the passing of Justice Ginsburg.”